A teenager is escorted home by the police: it is the nightmare of many parents. What will happen next? How can they help their child against the law? What are the possible consequences?

A young person suspected of having committed a criminal offense is not treated in the same way as an adult. The law obliges young people aged 12 to 17 to answer for their actions, but it encourages their social reintegration. It also promotes parental engagement throughout the process.

Alternatives to the trial

Alternatives to the trial

Depending on the situation of the young person and the seriousness of the offense, different scenarios are possible. They seek, as much as possible, to avoid the trial.Adolescent and criminal offense: several possible consequences

The different speakers

The different speakers

A teenager is never alone in the justice system. Throughout the process following his arrest, he will meet various professionals.

The role of the parent: throughout the process

The role of the parent: throughout the process

The law provides for parents to be informed of measures taken or proceedings brought against their child. Parents are encouraged to accompany him as soon as he is arrested by the police or if he has to go to court.

The responsibility of the parent

Parents can not be criminally prosecuted because their child is suspected of having committed a crime, except in rare cases. But beware! If the child has caused damage, they can be sued in civil and have to pay to repair the harm that has been caused.

The consequences for the teenager

The consequences on the future in case of arrest of a teenager are not the same as for an adult. A criminal offense may leave traces, but not forever.

Resource

Resource

If your child is in trouble with the law – document prepared by the Department of Justice Canada

Commission des services juridiques (legal aid)

You got caught by the police what’s going to happen?